Audi Q4 45 e-tron Black, refined and sophisticated

In Audi, Car Reviews, Electric cars by Robin Roberts

The Audi Q4 e-tron is proof that you can get more than you expect, even in today’s cut-throat and complex car market


Car Reviewed: Audi Q4 45 e-tron black edition RWD


Initially launched in March 2021, it was the fourth fully electric model in the brand’s e-tron series. However, it has undergone continuous improvement. Towards the end of 2023, it was boosted with a bigger battery and significant suspension and equipment changes to enhance driver appeal and practicality. It’s worked very well.

Initially launched in March 2021, it was the fourth fully electric model in the brand’s e-tron series. However, it has undergone continuous improvement. Towards the end of 2023, it was boosted with a bigger battery and significant suspension and equipment changes to enhance driver appeal and practicality. It’s worked very well.

Built on the Volkswagen Group’s MEB platform, which permits adaptation to a variety of body shapes, sizes and powertrains, the Q4 e-tron is a mid-size SUV with good room for occupants and their luggage.

The test car was fitted with £2,545 of options, including geyser blue paint, functions, and technology packs, including a Sonos premium sound system, inductive 9ZV phone link, rear 12v socket, and 2 USB-C ports, with high-performance multi-facet LEDs at both ends.

The series offers a good range, from £51,270 to £63,950, depending on whether it is rear- or all-wheel drive and is in Sport, S line, or Black Edition trim levels.

You can add pack features to build a model you want in SUV or coupe body styles, with the latter looking sleeker but offering marginally less room.

The Audi Q4 e-tron prioritizes comfort and space. The seats are generously roomy, highly adjustable, and exceptionally comfortable. Whether you’re in the front or the back, there’s plenty of space, and the offset split backrest quickly drops, significantly increasing the total luggage area. This spaciousness ensures a comfortable journey for all passengers.

Access to the load bed was good with a very low lip, wide and high opening tailgate and a sensibly shaped compartment with some underfloor storage and restraint hooks for netting and secure location of loads.

Inside, the doors opened wide to reveal a spacious cabin, even in the back, and the driver has a good range of column adjustment to the steering to tailor any desired position.

Everything sweeps around the driver, with the digital instruments and features displayed directly in front. This displays essential information in selectable formats and is supported by an equally big but more central infotainment hub. This hub covers the navigation, communications and vehicle settings.

It is a lot to take in and proved fiddly to use on the move. The compact touch switches on the wheel spokes were on the small side and sometimes could be misused.

It accelerated very strongly even in economy mode and was particularly sharply away in sport. The e-tron had very good mid-range punch and really effortlessly cruised at the legal motorway limit, but it was also so involving and enjoyable on A—and B-class roads. 

The handling was responsive and faithful, with excellent grip despite being only rear-wheel drive. This was helped by a compact turning circle when parking, very strong brakes and a generally smooth ride over all but the worst surfaces.

The driving controls were so easy: start, select drive or reverse and off you go. Five different modes could be utilised to maximise economy or performance, and individual steering and suspension settings as well as the amount of retardation desired. This proved very interesting in use.

We frequently started a journey with an indicated mileage range for charging, but thanks to the intelligent software in the Q4 e-tron, we consistently achieved better mileage than expected. This software optimizes the car’s energy consumption and regeneration, ensuring that you get the most out of each charge and providing a reassuring buffer of extra miles at the end of your journey. 

A car that gives you back something, now that is rare, desirable and unexpected.


For: Extremely refined and sophisticated powertrain, very good performance, excellent quality finish, comfortable seats, good handling, roomy

Against: Some road noises, stiff suspension on bad surfaces, fiddly secondary controls. 

© 2024 WheelsWithinWales

Author Rating 4/5

Car Reviewed: Audi Q4 45 e-tron black edition RWD


on the road price £99,995 as tested £110,545

  • 0-62mph 6.7secs
  • Top speed 112mph
  • Mechanical 210kW Motor, 77kWh Battery
  • Battery Range up to 280 miles
  • Max Power 286ps
  • BIK Rating 2%, £Zero FY, £590×5 SR
  • Dimensions MM 4590 L/1870 W/1640 H
  • CO2 emissions Zero
  • Transmission 1-speed automatic RWD
  • Bootspace 520 / 1490 1itres (seats folded)

Robin Roberts

Motoring Journalist

Robin contributes to a number of outlets in Wales and the UK, including the Driving Force editorial syndication agency feeding the biggest regional news and feature publishers in Britain.

Robin was the longest serving chairman of The Western Group of Motoring Writers. He specialises in the Welsh automotive sector and motor related businesses with interests in Wales and publishes WheelsWithinWales.uk which covers news, features, trade and motor sport in Wales.

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